All posts tagged: Food

London’s Best Food Markets | A Travel Top 6 Travel Guide!

London is filled to the brim with fine food and delicious dishes: the metropolis is a magnet for chefs and foodies alike and produces some of the finest restaurants in the world, the quirkiest cafes and, most importantly, some of the most awesome food markets. If you’re travelling, and not for very long, food markets are your best friend, serving up delicious grub and quickly too. As a devoted food lover and resident Londoner, I’ve had my fair share of London food market experience, so let me tell you where to go – you just have to decide what to eat. * Check out my latest Travel Top 6 travel guide here to read more about where to go for the best street food and food markets in London! Here are some pics to tantalise your tastebuds…

A Little Pisa Italy | An Italian Friday

Friday in Porto Venere and Pisa My last full day in Italy meant heading to Pisa, ready to catch an early morning flight (and see the famous tower of course) – if you’re travelling in the area, flights from Pisa are a lot cheaper than other local airports. I had a full 24 hours though until the ball dropped on my trip, so I didn’t want to waste any time. I packed my bag, headed to La Spezia and took a bus to Porto Venere, a fisherman’s town resembling the architecture of Cinque Terre but being a quieter option than the mass tourism found there. Finally found the bus that was diverted because of a weekly market in La Spezia… I walked along the waterfront of Porto Venere, soaking up the last of the sun I would see in a while (in the UK, Winter was fast approaching) and observed fisherman and fisher-women hard at work, trading fish, gutting fish and catching fish (not exactly in that order). Roaming the town caused far less tourist-induced …

Genoa Dreaming | An Italian Tuesday ~ Part 2

Tuesday in Genoa ~ Part 2 of 2 Late-afternoon hit and I jumped on a small yellow rickety bus to a nearby former fishing village called Boccadasse. Only a 30 minutes away, the exceptionally charming village has a small enclosed bay and a rocky shore, being the perfect spot to have a quiet moment amidst the hustle and bustle of the city. It’s a small place to explore, great for an hour or two max for those on the go. There’s an amazing view on a sort of “balcony” next to a church that overlooks the sea and village just at its edge, located at the end main promenade in the area and where you’ll likely come from when getting the bus from Genoa. When you take the rocky main path down, you can walk up and down paths around the surrounding tiny coloured houses or just lay on the beach and enjoy the sound of the waves licking the rocks. Impatient to wait for the sunset, having initially thought to see it at Boccadasse …

Genevan Joy | An Italian Tuesday ~ Part 1

Tuesday in Genoa ~ Part 1 of 2 Plans to explore a bit of the city when I had arrived the previous evening went swiftly out the window as I reached my hostel and rested my poor legs. In no time at all, I had to search for dinner and then night had fallen (alongside my eyelids). After the deepest of deep sleeps I awoke to climb up to Spinata Castelletto through the city’s steep and winding paths. Once a fortress of Castelletto, this ‘balcony’ offers a 360 view where one can admire the multicoloured terraced buildings, medieval towers and Baroque peaks and domes of the city. The early morning sun brought about a haze on Genoa’s skyline, and so I decided to make a later return to see the sunset and the city’s beauty in a different light. Meanwhile, caffeine was in order. Slowly stepping back down the steep trail up, I embedded myself into the winding spaghetti of Genevan streets, the buzzing arteries of the old part of the city. Whilst looking for …

Milano Moments | An Italian Monday

Monday in Milan After finally reaching Italy, after a period of life a few years back where I had become truly obsessed with the country (think fan girl map-posters, learning the language, and even learning how to make pasta from scratch (dedicated, I know)), it seemed surreal. From immediately being surrounded by Italian to watching businessmen and women zip around the streets on vibrant Vespas, I was in my weird 16-year-old self’s dream. For the next 5 days, I aimed to cram in as much of North-West Italy as sanely possible and as a lone-traveller – a real Italian adventure. Day one: exploring Milan. What could only compensate for having to wake up at 2:30 in the morning to catch a 5am flight to Milan from Budapest was dining the best breakfast bistro/cafe I could find – but of course, a trip to Italy should start in no other way. After thorough research of my pre-pencilled-in Italian locations, I reached my first checkpoint: Bianco Latte. Literally translating to “White Milk” this little cafe/restaurant/patisserie joint is …

An Apple (Day) a…Year

It’s the most wonderful time of the year… no it’s not Christmas, pfft, it’s Apple Day! As the September sun sets on the year’s Summer, October brings about an annual chill, one laced with foggy breath, warm spiced drinks and the crunch of leaves afoot. Autumn spares no second to bombard the UK, Winter following behind with no mercy (although the former is rather the preferred season). But Autumn, although chilly and wet and sometimes a little miserable, by far is the most magical time of year here – at least for me anyway. I may be repeating myself from last year’s Apple Day article (which can be found here if you’re interested) but this really comes from the heart… I love Autumn and the festivities it brings about. It’s an extra delight that Apple Day falls in peak Autumn time in the UK, the annual Harvest festivities celebrating all that’s great and wonderful about this historic harvest period. I vividly remember sitting in primary school assemblies, surrounded by masses of fellow school pupils and singing …

A Foodie’s Guide to Northwest Italy ~ a Travel Top 6™ Travel Guide!

Whilst wandering through the spaghetti of streets, one can not only become lost in the city of Genoa but bamboozled as to what to sample first from the splendour that the city, situated on the coast of the North-West of Italy, has to offer.

Ancient History at Your Fingertips ~ Sunday

Nearby to the Ancient Greek Agora you can find Hadrian’s Library and The Roman Agora. The Roman Agora is far less impressive than the Greek version, but of course as a tourist, one must visit everything. This Agora was built in the 1st century by Julius Caesar and Augustus, and has a more spectacular building still intact; the Tower of Winds, the structure featuring a combination of sundials, a water clock, and a wind vane. And at the entrance of the Agora still stands The Gate of Athena Archegetis. After much sightseeing, we were starved, heading toward the neighbourhood of Plaka once again to visit another local-recommended cafe/restaurant “Yiasemi”. Located on the famous steps of Plaka, Yiasemi is tucked in at the side between some other restaurants in the area. Upon entry, there are narrow concrete steps that lead to ledges you can perch on to eat, or further bar stools and ledges or regular tables and chairs. The ceiling rose high above and the walls were covered in the most beautiful array of vibrant green plants. Through different …

First Aid Mondays

Monday became a day of recovery from a little too much wine at Cinque, slowly meandering through the centre of the city, having seen nearly all the ruins and now in need of souvenirs (and rest). To nurse our hangovers, we discovered Klimataria, a tiny tucked away authentic Greek restaurant, dishing up homey Greek dishes with generous portions. It’s located in a kind of random part of the city, not next to the usual tourist restaurants in Monastiraki. If you get lost, look for the shrubs and leaves sticking out of the building and the vibrant yellow interior glowing from the inside. On the menu for us was an uplifting and delicately delicious pan of scrambled eggs with mixed veggies, like tomatoes, peppers and even some shards of bacon (not a vegetable, I know). To follow, I had a dish with Aubergine “cream” (silky, creamy pureed aubergine) with tender chunks of beef in a rich tomato sauce. The view from our Airbnb. Fresh sesame bread popularly sold on the streets of Greece. For souvenirs the …

A Slice of Pie & History ~ Sunday

This morning we hit up a renown local cafe in the city, it having been around since 1931 as a family business. It began by distributing milk and later producing puddings, creams, yoghurts, butter honey and pan pastries, all made according to traditional recipes of course. They also make sure to carefully source their ingredients from select producers in Greece, making the food is more delicious than it already is. Hidden under vines and leaves that ripple across and over two buildings on wooden structures, cafe furniture is spread out in front of the cafe, illuminated by warm yellow lights inside and green neon in-front boasting its name “Stani”. We had to try multiple things, of course, ordering the famous traditional sheep milk yoghurt served with thick fresh honey and crunchy walnuts, a filo cream-pie and famous Greek cheese-pie, with hot coffee on the side to wash it all down with. The yoghurt was exquisite; delightfully creamy and sour with a traditional “crust” atop, the sweetness of the honey cutting through the sharpness of the …